Peter Smith Sculptures

You’re My Cup Of Tea Sculpture by Peter Smith

£493.50

Peter Smith’s Our House, from a limited edition size of 295. This piece is Sculpture.

Additional Information

Artist

Peter Smith

Medium

Sculpture

Image Size

12” x 8″

Edition Size

295

Availability

Low Availability

Product Description

You’re My Cup Of Tea Sculpture by Peter Smith

Peter gets his ideas from everyday life; in the street, the people he meets, the feelings he experience. He has even taken inspiration from history, in his Lost Impossimals Collection. At the end of every day he has hundreds of images, fighting for his attention and the chance to be painted; quite often he gets carried away with excitement and fills his sketchbook from cover to cover within hours giving him a rich source of reference material. Peter takes inspiration from other artists too; the quirkiness of Will Bullas with his strong characters and whimsical titles, but also the surreal Salvador Dali which has offered Peter an unusual slant on the world. But inspiration ultimately comes from deep inside, drawing on all his experiences. It’s only when painting he places his real emotions down, each canvas receiving a different layer of emotion with each session.

My background is self taught; all my Impossimal artwork is oil paint on board, painstakingly created using methods that belies their sometimes simple appearance. Scale models of every scene and Impossimal is created beforehand, some of the models and sets are upwards of six feet long and contain up to a thousand components. Each painting also has its own story, sometimes based on real people and at other times based on pure fiction twisted with history. All my Impossimal artwork contain hidden items, puzzles, connections, dot-2-dots and numerous other little tricks to beguile and entertain, some you will need a mirror to see whilst others will require them being turned upside-down or viewed in a darkened room.

“My influences come from entertaining authors rather than artists and my art comes from childhood and imagination rather than a need to paint reality. Nostalgic escapism I prefer to call it but you may prefer something else, either way I know one thing, It’s all painted with a passion and a little bit of that childhood sparkle that so easily disappears when we forget how to be a child.” – Peter Smith